Air Under Your Wings

CELEBRATING OPENING UP 

The following African destinations have recently announced that fully vaccinated visitors are no longer required to undergo PCR testing prior to departure or on arrival: South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia, Kenya, Tanzania, Seychelles 

MARKING A RETURN

Popular airlines flying between Cape Town and Europe include Air France, KLM, Lufthansa, British Airways, South African Airways, and shortly Belgian Airlines.

From the USA, United Airlines has resumed nonstop service between Newark Liberty International Airport and Cape Town. Operating three times a week, flights depart Newark at 8:30 p.m. ET, arriving in Cape Town at 6:00 p.m. local time the next day. The return flight leaves Cape Town at 8:50 p.m. and arrives in Newark at 5:50 p.m. ET the next day.

“United’s direct flights from New York/Newark cut the usual travel time to Cape Town by more than five hours, giving visitors extra time to enjoy the beauty and majesty of South Africa,” said Patrick Quayle, United’s SVP of international network planning and alliances.

The airline deploys a Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner aircraft featuring 257 seats—48 flat-bed seats in United Polaris business class, 21 Premium Plus and 188 in Economy, including 39 Economy Plus seats.

Part of Delta’s planned return to South Africa includes flights to Cape Town. These flights would form part of a triangular route with Johannesburg and Atlanta. Currently Delta operates direct flights between Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and Johannesburg’s OR Tambo International Airport. 

GETTING A HANDLE ON PERSPECTIVE 

Africa is a huge continent. Few people realisese how big it is … three times bigger than the USA.
This is because most of us use the standard Mercator world map.
This method of map-drawing, invented by Flemish cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569, found favour because it preserved local angular relationships, making navigation easier.
But it also massively distorts size and distances as you get closer to the two poles, because it’s tough to represent a three-dimensional world in a two-dimensional map.

There is a tool, dubbed “The True Size” that allows you to type in the name of any country and move the outline around to see how the scale of the country gets distorted the closer it gets to the poles.

Try it out to get a true idea of the sheer size of Africa! 

 

Comments are closed.