Random Acts of Wildness

The World Environment Day 2020’s theme is ‘Celebrate Biodiversity‘.
The theme is extremely relevant since humans are part of the ecosystem and cannot survive in isolation. With most countries in lockdown, Nature seems to have been able to reclaim some space. And taken a bit of a breather.

Today was to be hosted in Colombia, in partnership with Germany. Colombia is one of the largest “Megadiverse” nations in the world to hold 10% of the planet’s biodiversity. Since it is part of the Amazon rain forest, Colombia ranks first in bird and orchid species diversity and second in plants, butterflies, freshwater fish, and amphibians.

In The UK, people are pledging to undertake daily “random acts of wildness” throughout June,  as part of a burgeoning campaign to appreciate local nature and benefit from time in green space.
Started five years ago, the Wildlife Trusts’ 30 Days Wild campaign encourages daily activities throughout June to enjoy and appreciate the nature on our doorsteps.

Lucy McRobert, author of 365 Days Wild, said: “A lot of little random acts of wildness can lead to something amazing. Too many nature narratives talk about the British countryside but overwhelmingly, people taking part in this campaign are in cities, towns and suburbs.
This year it’s really chimed with people because we are actively turning to nature for comfort and solace in a very scary time – knowing that the seasons keep coming, that the swifts will return and the pigeons will keep nesting.”

One woman left wildflower seeds in envelopes on park benches, and finders got in touch with her through the  30 Days Wild Facebook page. Another found a rope swing in her local woods and enjoyed a swing for the first time in decades. A fitness blogger said she’d be going “plogging” – combining her jog with picking up any plastic she sees on her route.

McRobert said little actions in nature not only benefited people’s mental and physical health, but helped them become more conscious of the biodiversity crisis and more aware of other species.
She said: “A lot of little random acts of wildness can lead to something amazing” particularly when we are actively turning to nature for comfort and solace in a very scary time.

Why dont you join in. Become more conscious of the biodiversity crisis and more aware of other species. Share your random act with us. We’ll love to hear what inspires you.
Our random act is to avidly birdwatch – in winter – when aloes nourish sunbirds with welcome necter.   

Bottom image Male Malachite Sunbird feeding on aloes in the setting sun, courtesy Rod Standing  
Top image courtesy Indian Express: Getty Images/Thinkstock; designed by Gargi Singh
Acknowledgement: The Guardian: Nature on UK doorsteps

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